The Irving Institute is currently accepting applications for the following:

TL1 Training Program for Doctoral Students and Postdoctoral Appointees For Immediate Start and 2018-2019
TRx Pre-Proposals Apply by December 1


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Please read the CaMPR webpage for a full description of the program, list of previous winners and examples of winning applications.

What is CaMPR?

Who is eligible to apply?

What is the CaMPR I planning grant?

How does the CaMPR Phase I application differ from most other pilot/seed money grant applications?

What kind of planning activities would be appropriate to include in the Phase I application?

The Phase I selection criteria include the “meaningful involvement of junior faculty.” What does this mean?

What resources are available to me as I develop my ideas and list of research needs for the Phase I application?

 

Q:  What is CaMPR?
The Collaborative and Multidisciplinary Pilot Research (CaMPR) program is a two-phase pilot grant award that provides funds for a planning grant (Phase I) and pilot study (Phase II), to support the formation of a newly-configured investigative team from diverse disciplines, with the aim of addressing a significant health problem at the cellular, individual or community level.

Q:  Who is eligible to apply?
Applicants (PIs) must have CUMC faculty standing at the Assistant Professor rank or higher in either the clinical or tenure track (includes those on the Research Scientist track) at the time of award, if selected for funding.  Postdoctoral fellows are not eligible to apply. 

Each team must be composed of at least one junior – senior mentorship pair and other collaborators who have not previously worked together in a substantive way.  In keeping with the overall mission of the Irving Institute, collaborative teams (limited to no more than 6 investigators per team) must represent at least two of the CUMC schools (Medicine, Dental Medicine, Nursing, Public Health); investigators from the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital as well as other disciplines and schools from the Morningside Campus (e.g. Fu Foundation School of Engineering, School of Social Work) may represent the second school.  

NOTE:  Although senior leaders of the Irving Institute may be consulted during the preparation of the application, they should not be listed as co-investigators or collaborators.  For a list of these individuals please: http://www.irvinginstitute.columbia.edu/people/executive_leaders.html

Q: What is the CaMPR I planning grant?
CaMPR I is a $15,000 planning grant that supports activities to:  
1) identify and assemble a newly-configured multidisciplinary team with expertise in diverse methodologies;  
2) design, develop and submit a pilot grant proposal (Phase II)  by the end of the 3-month grant period.  

NOTE:  Only winners of the Phase I planning grants are eligible to proceed with the Phase II submission.

Q: How does the CaMPR Phase I application differ from most other pilot/seed money grant applications?
CaMPR Phase I is a three-month planning award carried out by a newly-assembled team of collaborators who have not worked together before. Therefore, the Phase I application should be about planning and development.  It is NOT a proposal based on preliminary data or guided by a well-crafted set of specific aims and testable hypotheses at the time of submission.  Although each team should have identified an addressable health problem in need of an innovative solution and a few key members of the team to start the planning process, the overall aims and direction of planning activities should be somewhat general at the time of submission.  It is expected that the final set of team members, methods and approaches will evolve in the early months as the team consolidates, generates new ideas, and benefits from interaction and new insights.

Q: What kind of planning activities would be appropriate to include in the Phase I application?
Past winners have proposed activities related to team identification and assembly, group communication strategies, off-site consultation visits, and state-of-the-science meetings.  Sample applications from previous Phase I winners are available on the following webpage:  http://www.irvinginstitute.columbia.edu/research_ops/pcsr2.html

Q: The Phase I selection criteria include the “meaningful involvement of junior faculty.” What does this mean?
One of CaMPR’s goals is to help train the next generation of translational research investigators.  With this goal in mind, one or more junior faculty members should play leadership roles (either as PI or Co-PI) in the development and implementation of all aspects of the award, with the collaborative oversight and guidance of a senior mentor.  Ideally, the senior mentor should bring complementary, new expertise to enhance the development of novel methodologies and approaches.

Q: What resources are available to me as I develop my ideas and list of research needs for the Phase I application?
For additional guidance about your eligibility and the scientific fit of your ideas with the CaMPR program, schedule an appointment with Dr. Nancy Reame, Director of the Pilot Studies Resource, by visiting the following webpage and submitting a consultation request:
http://www.irvinginstitute.columbia.edu/research_ops/request_form_login.html

  • As part of the planning activities and development of the Phase II application, you should review the Irving Institute Resources and seek consultation with each Resource.
  • Consult Columbia University Scientific Profiles (CUSP) for potential collaborators.  CUSP provides the names, grants, and publications of all CUMC faculty and can be accessed by visiting:  http://irvinginstitute.columbia.edu/cusp